passports

Could vaccine passports be your ticket to quarantine-free vacations?

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Needing documents to travel is nothing new — after all, checking in for a flight requires some form of ID, and if you’re bound for somewhere foreign, it’ll have to be a passport. The same goes for car or train trips that cross the U.S. border, where from 2023 you’ll need that blue booklet or a state-issued Real ID.

But a passport to simply check into a hotel or board a cruise ship? It’s a distinct possibility in this age of pandemic-related restrictions. The idea of so-called vaccine passports proving inoculation against

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Hawaii May Require Vaccine Passports For All Travelers Starting This Summer

Traveling between the Hawaiian islands is about to get easier — at least for Hawaiian residents who were vaccinated against COVID-19 in Hawaii.

Starting May 11, as long as at least 14 days have passed since their second COVID-19 vaccination, state residents who were vaccinated in Hawaii will be able to bypass the state’s 10-day travel quarantine without going through the Safe Travels Hawaii pre-testing program or post-arrival county testing, Governor David Ige explained in a press conference. This exemption will make it easier for people to conduct business and see family members.

“This phased approach will allow us to

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Japan to introduce “vaccine passports” for international travel

Japan plans to introduce “vaccine passports” to make it easier for people who have been inoculated against COVID-19 to travel internationally, government sources said Wednesday.

The passports are expected to be in the form of a smartphone app, with travelers scanning QR codes at airports before boarding flights or when entering the country.

The government is moving forward with the plan in the hope of resuming business travel that has virtually stopped during the pandemic, joining the European Union, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations and China.

“Other countries are doing it, so Japan will have to consider it too,”

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Japan to introduce ‘vaccine passports’ for international travel

Japan plans to introduce “vaccine passports” to make it easier for people who have been inoculated against COVID-19 to travel internationally, government sources said Wednesday.

The passports are expected to be in the form of a smartphone app, with travelers scanning a QR code at the airport before boarding a flight or when entering the country.

The government is moving forward with the plan in the hope of resuming business travel, which has virtually stopped during the pandemic, to shore up the world’s third-largest economy.

Taro Kono, the minister in charge of Japan’s vaccination efforts, said last month the government

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Ige Calls For Patience On Travel Restrictions, Vaccine Passports

Gov. David Ige on Monday expressed cautious optimism that the next several weeks could prove to be a turning point for Hawaii’s fight against COVID-19, even as the number of confirmed cases rises on Maui and Oahu.

In an interview with the Honolulu Star-Advertiser’s “Spotlight” program, Ige said that a vaccine passport that would allow travelers to skip pre-flight tests and post-flight quarantines could be just four weeks away.

He also said that interisland travel restrictions could be lifted in May, assuming Hawaii’s vaccine rollout goes according to plan and everyone who wants to receive a vaccine can on that

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Booking Holdings CEO backs vaccine passports, says makes travel safer

As more people are immunized against the coronavirus, so-called vaccine passports would make it safer for people to travel, according to Glenn Fogel, the CEO of travel company Booking Holdings.

“I’m not sure why people still object to it, in terms of making it safer for people to travel,” Fogel said in an interview on CNBC’s “The Exchange.”

The Biden administration has indicated that it wants to set up a system of providing documentation of a person’s vaccination status, which can help make it easier to tell who’s protected against the virus and who’s not, but

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