Sweden to launch digital coronavirus ‘vaccine passport’ to allow travel

The Swedish government on Thursday said it will be launching a digital coronavirus “vaccine passport” to allow people who have been vaccinated to travel.

Digitalization Minister Anders Ygeman said three authorities in Sweden had been asked to work on producing the certificate, and the plan is to coordinate it with the World Health Organization and the European Union.

Ygeman told a news conference that vaccination certifications will likely be required for travel and “possibly taking part in other activities” when Sweden and neighboring countries start to open up again.

The announcement came after Denmark’s government on Wednesday said it is joining forces with businesses to develop a digital passport that would show whether people have been vaccinated against the coronavirus, allowing them to travel and help ease restrictions on public life.

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Finance Minister Morten Boedskov told a news conference that “in three, four months, a digital corona passport will be ready for use in, for example, business travel.”

“It is absolutely crucial for us to be able to restart Danish society so that companies can get back on track. Many Danish companies are global companies with the whole world as a market,” he added.

The Danish government said it will decide later on whether the digital passport should be used for purposes other than travel to help reopen public life.

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The European Commission, meanwhile, has been weighing proposals to issue vaccination certificates to help get travelers to their vacation destinations more quickly and avoid another disastrous summer for Europe’s tourism sector. But the EU’s executive arm said for now such certificates would only be used for medical purposes, for instance to monitor the possible adverse effects of vaccines.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.