Mayor announces departure of Public Safety Chief Hess

Mayor Greg Fischer today announced that the city’s Chief of Public Safety, Amy Hess, is

Mayor Greg Fischer today announced that the city’s Chief of Public Safety, Amy Hess, is leaving Metro Government in May.

Chief Hess joined Metro in February 2020 as Chief of Public Services, overseeing Public Works, Emergency Services, Corrections, Louisville Fire, Fleet and Facilities, and Animal Services. In May 2020, after former Police Chief Steve Conrad announced his retirement, Mayor Fischer asked Hess to take a new role as Chief of Public Safety, overseeing LMPD, Louisville Fire, Emergency Services and Corrections. Prior to joining LMG, Hess was Executive Assistant Director of the FBI’s Criminal, Cyber, Response, and Services Branch, and was the highest-ranking woman in the FBI.

 Hess said she joined Metro partly in an effort to be closer to family and is leaving now to actually devote more time to them.  

“I’m grateful to have had this opportunity to serve our community and the place I call home,” Hess said. “This past year has given me tremendous insight and a new appreciation for all that local government does, especially during periods of tumultuous change.  Now, after 30 years of public service, it is time for me to prioritize my family and find other ways I can contribute.

 “I’d like to thank the dedicated employees of Metro Government, particularly in our public safety departments, who have made so many personal sacrifices to help others and keep us safe,” she continued. “It’s been a privilege to serve alongside them.”

She will, however, continue to serve as Mayor Fischer’s representative on the Louisville Metro’s Criminal Justice Commission, a 29-member board responsible for criminal justice and public safety planning, research, and system-wide coordination and collaboration.

The Mayor today thanked Hess for bringing her vast management experience, and her deep knowledge and experience with our region to LMG and agreeing to continue that work on the Commission.

“Throughout her tenure with Metro, Amy has proven to be a knowledgeable, skilled and steady hand, and she’s helped guide our public safety team through some tumultuous times,” the Mayor said. “We wish her well as she takes a well-earned break, but we are so pleased she will continue in the critical role with our Criminal Justice Commission.”

The Mayor and his leadership team will be evaluating reporting structures in the weeks ahead.

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ReplyForward

MO

Mayor’s Press Office

Fri 4/2/2021 10:31 AM

To:

 Lord, Joseph A.

Mayor announces departure of Public Safety Chief Hess

Will still serve as Mayor’s representative on Criminal Justice Commission 

LOUISVILLE, KY (April 2, 2021) – Mayor Greg Fischer today announced that the city’s Chief of Public Safety, Amy Hess, is leaving Metro Government in May.

Chief Hess joined Metro in February 2020 as Chief of Public Services, overseeing Public Works, Emergency Services, Corrections, Louisville Fire, Fleet and Facilities, and Animal Services. In May 2020, after former Police Chief Steve Conrad announced his retirement, Mayor Fischer asked Hess to take a new role as Chief of Public Safety, overseeing LMPD, Louisville Fire, Emergency Services and Corrections. Prior to joining LMG, Hess was Executive Assistant Director of the FBI’s Criminal, Cyber, Response, and Services Branch, and was the highest-ranking woman in the FBI.

 Hess said she joined Metro partly in an effort to be closer to family and is leaving now to actually devote more time to them.  

“I’m grateful to have had this opportunity to serve our community and the place I call home,” Hess said. “This past year has given me tremendous insight and a new appreciation for all that local government does, especially during periods of tumultuous change.  Now, after 30 years of public service, it is time for me to prioritize my family and find other ways I can contribute.

 “I’d like to thank the dedicated employees of Metro Government, particularly in our public safety departments, who have made so many personal sacrifices to help others and keep us safe,” she continued. “It’s been a privilege to serve alongside them.”

She will, however, continue to serve as Mayor Fischer’s representative on the Louisville Metro’s Criminal Justice Commission, a 29-member board responsible for criminal justice and public safety planning, research, and system-wide coordination and collaboration.

The Mayor today thanked Hess for bringing her vast management experience, and her deep knowledge and experience with our region to LMG and agreeing to continue that work on the Commission.

“Throughout her tenure with Metro, Amy has proven to be a knowledgeable, skilled and steady hand, and she’s helped guide our public safety team through some tumultuous times,” the Mayor said. “We wish her well as she takes a well-earned break, but we are so pleased she will continue in the critical role with our Criminal Justice Commission.”

The Mayor and his leadership team will be evaluating reporting structures in the weeks ahead.