CDC releases new guidance on travel for fully vaccinated people

The CDC announced Friday, fully vaccinated people can safely travel and are considered ‘low-risk’. The

The CDC announced Friday, fully vaccinated people can safely travel and are considered ‘low-risk’. The updated guidance comes as Eppley Airfield said air travel is taking off again. “We’re just wrapping up the spring break travel period, and we did see an increase of activity for that,” said Steve McCoy, Chief Information and Development Officer at Eppley. With plenty of people arriving at the airport Friday ahead of the Easter holiday weekend, McCoy said they expect the trend to continue. “We would anticipate here at Eppley Airfield that traffic will continue to pick up, and we’ll continue to see increases in activity here going into the summer months,” McCoy said. Elise Aust, managing partner with Custom Cruises and Travel called the CDC’s guidance common sense news. “I mean, you know, everybody needs to be careful and everybody needs to follow the protocol of masking and distancing and all of that, but the world is opening up, and that’s, that’s the exciting news. And clearly vaccines are working,” she said. Aust said people are ready to plan their next trip. “We have been getting a lot of calls. You know people are booking, they’re excited about traveling, and so a lot of questions on what do I need to do?,” Aust said. She noted, some locations still require proof of a negative COVID-19 test or time in quarantine upon arrival. “Even though the CDC has said what they’re saying, that doesn’t negate the fact that you need to follow the guidelines of where you’re going to be ultimately traveling to,” Aust said. According to Aust, multiple cruise lines have already announced travelers will have to provide proof of vaccination. She said many in the travel industry believe this will become the norm for certain types of trips. “Just like if you were traveling to Africa and you needed a yellow fever shot and then you had to show proof in a visa that you’ve gotten that,” Aust said, “I think that it’ll probably be somehow embedded into our passports.”

The CDC announced Friday, fully vaccinated people can safely travel and are considered ‘low-risk’.

The updated guidance comes as Eppley Airfield said air travel is taking off again.

“We’re just wrapping up the spring break travel period, and we did see an increase of activity for that,” said Steve McCoy, Chief Information and Development Officer at Eppley.

With plenty of people arriving at the airport Friday ahead of the Easter holiday weekend, McCoy said they expect the trend to continue.

“We would anticipate here at Eppley Airfield that traffic will continue to pick up, and we’ll continue to see increases in activity here going into the summer months,” McCoy said.

Elise Aust, managing partner with Custom Cruises and Travel called the CDC’s guidance common sense news.

“I mean, you know, everybody needs to be careful and everybody needs to follow the protocol of masking and distancing and all of that, but the world is opening up, and that’s, that’s the exciting news. And clearly vaccines are working,” she said.

Aust said people are ready to plan their next trip.

“We have been getting a lot of calls. You know people are booking, they’re excited about traveling, and so a lot of questions on what do I need to do?,” Aust said.

She noted, some locations still require proof of a negative COVID-19 test or time in quarantine upon arrival.

“Even though the CDC has said what they’re saying, that doesn’t negate the fact that you need to follow the guidelines of where you’re going to be ultimately traveling to,” Aust said.

According to Aust, multiple cruise lines have already announced travelers will have to provide proof of vaccination.

She said many in the travel industry believe this will become the norm for certain types of trips.

“Just like if you were traveling to Africa and you needed a yellow fever shot and then you had to show proof in a visa that you’ve gotten that,” Aust said, “I think that it’ll probably be somehow embedded into our passports.”